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Water changes in swimming pools

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Water changes in swimming pools

Postby wrenfeathers » Sat 29 Sep, 2018 4:24 pm

Ok, not exactly an aquarium question but related nonetheless.

Water changes in swimming pools don't seem to be done at all. Why not?

Surely over years of use they accumulate chemicals like sunscreen, deodorant, leech from plastic toys, etc. sure there are filters to export leaves and such, but the dissolved chemicals would always remain, right?

Can anybody add some knowledge/ Expertise?

I've tried a google search and there seems to be very little on the topic.

We go to so much trouble making sure our water is perfect in our aquariums, it seems logical to me we should demand at least the same standards, if not better, for the water we swim in ( and swallow half the time).

The next question follows, then: do public pools have their water changed??
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby atti » Sun 30 Sep, 2018 3:14 pm

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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby Onsan » Wed 17 Oct, 2018 9:15 am

A different kettle of fish entirely.
Pools are operated as highly oxidised environments, meaning the amount of chlorine/UV pumped into them will ensure that many contaminants are "denatured" toward a less active state.
Proteins and polymers are attacked and broken down, bacteria and algae are lysed, flocked and filtered as are certain contaminants (such as phosphates and colloidal matter).
Some large pools do still require draining and refilling, but generally not as a normal operational requirement these days, usually for maintenance of the pool structure itself.
Most salinity issues (in that is included carbonate salts) are managed via backwashing of media filters, that is, a portion of the water is flushed to sewers regularly during cleaning of the filters, this removes a portion of the "old" water which is then topped up with "fresh" water, effectively diluting wastes similar to how aquariums are managed with water changes.
So while they generally don't change their water volume entirely in one event, it is partially changed regularly, however water costs to resupply and treat so it is minimised as much as possible.

All that being said, pool types and operation, same principles are applied but how they are achieved is many and varied as it is with aquariums.
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby wrenfeathers » Wed 17 Oct, 2018 4:05 pm

Interesting stuff.

Thanks for the replies.
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby shrimpman » Wed 24 Oct, 2018 8:33 pm

They are emptied more than you think. I'm guessing you don't own a pool.

Every time you vaccum or backwash you flush it out. Heavy rains, you pump it out. So, yes, the water does get changed.
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby Onsan » Fri 26 Oct, 2018 1:59 pm

shrimpman wrote:They are emptied more than you think. I'm guessing you don't own a pool.

Every time you vaccum or backwash you flush it out. Heavy rains, you pump it out. So, yes, the water does get changed.

I work in the field, if you're emptying your pool for anything other than repairs you're doing it wrong.
You should be running your vacuum through the media filter, not to waste. Only backwash from the media filter should go to waste, you're wasting water, salt and chlorine by vacuuming to waste.
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby wrenfeathers » Sat 27 Oct, 2018 3:03 pm

Yeah, I own a pool.
Water levels rarely get to the stage where I pump water out, so negligible amount there.

I believe the sand filters are the ones where you backwash and get rid of water that way - but I have a cartridge filter, so don't lose any water that way either.
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby michaela » Mon 05 Nov, 2018 9:29 am

So disappointed that this wasn't about someone who had set up a reef rock pool because their kids moved out of home.. I guess you have a good point though ;)
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby wrenfeathers » Mon 05 Nov, 2018 4:32 pm

Ha!
Now that would be cool...
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby gizmo1 » Sun 11 Nov, 2018 7:51 pm

I own a swim school and the answer is yes we change and empty our pool water. It keeps our pool healthier and keeps TDS readings within the accepted range. Cheers
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Re: Water changes in swimming pools

Postby wrenfeathers » Mon 12 Nov, 2018 4:54 pm

Good to know, Gizmo1. Thanks for the reply.

I'll be doing some sort of water change of my pool every so often.
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